Tag Archives: workers’ compensation

Uninsured subcontractors can increase insurance costs

Subcontractors benefit companies in various industries like utility and construction with specialized knowledge to ensure product quality at a lower cost. However, these companies need to consider the additional liability risks associated with a subcontractor’s work and safety. Careless subcontractors that do not obtain proper insurance coverage can increase a company’s liability and negatively affect its financial results.

What types of insurance coverage does a subcontractor need? What happens when a subcontractor is uninsured without a company’s knowledge? Milliman’s Rachel Soich provides the answers in her article “Subcontractors: How a common business practice could lead to a mountain of insurance costs.”

Milliman’s gradient A.I. platform brings first A.I. predictive analytics solution to professional employer organization (PEO) market

Milliman has announced that gradient A.I., a Milliman predictive analytics platform, now offers a professional employer organization (PEO)-specific solution for managing workers’ compensation risk. gradient A.I. is an advanced analytics and A.I. platform that uncovers hidden patterns in big data to deliver a daily decision support system (DSS) for insurers, self-insurers, and PEOs. It’s the first solution of its kind to be applied to PEO underwriting and claims management.

“Obtaining workers’ compensation insurance capacity has been historically difficult because of the lack of credible data to understand a PEO’s expected loss outcomes. Additionally, there were no formal pricing tools specific to the PEO community for use with any level of credibility—until gradient A.I. Pricing within a loss-sensitive environment can now be done with the science of Milliman combined with the instinct and intuition of the PEO,” says Paul Hughes, CEO of Libertate/RiskMD, an insurance agency/data analytics firm that specializes in providing coverage and consulting services to PEOs. “Within a policy term we can understand things like claims frequency and profitability, and we can get very good real-time month-to-month directional insight, in terms of here’s what you should have expected, here’s what happened, and as a result did we win or lose?”

gradient A.I., a transformational insurtech solution, aggregates client data from multiple sources, deposits it into a data warehouse, and normalizes the data in comprehensive data silos. “The uniqueness for PEOs and their service providers—and the power of gradient A.I.—emerges from the application of machine-learning capabilities on the PEOs’ data normalization,” says Stan Smith, a predictive analytics consultant and Milliman’s gradient A.I. practice leader. “With the gradient A.I. data warehouse, companies can reduce time, costs, and resources.”

For more on how gradient A.I. and Libertate brought predictive analytics solutions to PEOs, click here.

MillimanMAX, a Milliman predictive analytics platform, renamed “gradient A.I.” to reflect advanced analytic techniques

Milliman has announced the launch of gradient A.I. (formerly MillimanMAX), an advanced analytics platform that uncovers hidden patterns in big data in order to improve workers’ compensation claims management. The gradient A.I. platform is a transformative InsurTech technology built on the latest advanced techniques and artificial intelligence (A.I.), and delivers a daily decision support system (DSS) for insurers and self-insurers.

Milliman has been conducting research and development in the most advanced areas of artificial intelligence—also known as “deep learning”—for over five years, and the rebranding of gradient A.I. is a reflection of that enhanced experience. Our goal with gradient A.I. is to deliver the most actionable intelligence to our clients in the form of “decision support—and we’re pleased to note that so far clients have seen underwriting profit improvements of 3% to 5% and claim cost reductions in the neighborhood of 5% to 10%.

The key differentiator of gradient A.I. is its ability to identify relationships between structured and unstructured data, unlocking powerful and previously unknown information to deliver a competitive advantage to self-insured groups, carriers, and third-party administrators within the property and casualty (P&C) market. Additional product features include a custom data warehouse, easily identifiable and actionable risk drivers, dynamic reporting, and customizable reports and dashboard.

To learn more, click here.

2017 California Hospitals Workers’ Compensation Benchmarking Report

The workers’ compensation environment in California has been surprisingly stable over the last several years. Despite this stability, workers’ compensation remains one of the most complex exposures for employers. This study by Milliman’s Richard Lord and Stephen Koca and Keenan’s Bill Poland and Daniel Mattioli provides fundamental healthcare industry benchmarks from which informed decisions related to managing workers’ compensation in California can be made.

Projecting workers’ comp losses for self-insureds

Self-insureds that understand the factors used by actuaries to project workers’ compensation losses can better integrate them into their projection processes and benefit from insightful discussions with actuaries. Milliman consultants Carly Rowland and Richard Frese offer some perspective in the Business Insurance article “Ten considerations for projecting self-insured workers compensation losses.”

Court’s ruling has financial implication on Florida’s workers’ comp industry

Earlier this year, the Florida Supreme Court ruled that state law limiting attorney fees in workers’ compensation insurance cases was unconstitutional. The law was found to prevent challenges to the “reasonableness” of attorney’s fees awarded in such cases. In this article, Milliman consultant Simon Wong provides a brief history of Florida’s workers’ compensation system, discussing how the court’s ruling will affect carriers and self-insured employers moving forward.

Here’s an excerpt:

The court thus found the “irrebuttable presumption,” or inability of any claimant to challenge the fee, to be unconstitutional. In striking down the fee law, the court directed the state to return to previous law “until the Legislature acts to cure the constitutional infirmity,” essentially returning Florida’s workers’ compensation attorney fees structure to the pre-SB 50A system based on hourly fees. The decision emphasizes that “the fee schedule remains the starting point, and that the revival of the predecessor statute does not mean that claimants’ attorneys will receive a windfall. Only where the claimant can demonstrate … that the fee schedule results in an unreasonable fee—such as in a case like this—will the claimant’s attorney be entitled to a fee that deviates from the fee schedule.”

The concern is that this also means a return to the high pre-SB 50A levels of attorney-represented claim costs. In response to the Castellanos decision, the NCCI initially proposed a rate increase of 17.1% to new, renewal, and all in-force policies effective on or after August 1, 2016.1 Subsequently, the NCCI proposed amending the filing to include the impact of the Westphal decision as well, and proposed a rate increase of 19.6% effective October 1, 2016.2 It should also be noted that the Castellanos and Westphal decisions have a retroactive impact on all claims that remain open or are reopened on or after July 1, 2009, and January 1, 1994, respectively. Because workers’ compensation rate-making is prospective only, insurers are not able to recoup premium to cover such unforeseen retroactive system costs.

For now, carriers and self-insured employers can look for increasingly more expensive workers’ compensation claims in Florida. Unless a legislative solution of some kind emerges, they should start preparing for higher attorney’s fees. More changes from the courts and the legislature are almost certain and should be monitored closely.