Parallel cloud computing enhances actuarial analyses

Parsing a large computational process into smaller independent tasks that run in parallel to each other can help actuaries benefit from the time-saving efficiencies of cloud computing. Machine learning has parallel compute capabilities to assist with these tasks. In this article, Milliman’s Joe Long and Dan McCurley discuss how they were able to cut a three-month machine learning project down to four days using open source tools and the Microsoft Azure cloud.

Solvency II annual reporting: Variation analysis templates

Organisations completing their second full year of Solvency II reporting are required to submit four additional reporting templates. These additional templates disclose the change in the excess of assets over liabilities over the 12-month period since the previous set of annual reporting templates were submitted to regulators. In this briefing, Milliman’s Barry Murphy and Cormac Gleeson discuss these templates and provide insight on how to approach them.

Indonesia Life Insurance Newsletter, May 2018

According to the Indonesian Insurance Statistics published by the Financial Services Authority, the Indonesian life insurance industry achieved double-digit growth in 2017. Last year, the industry recorded a net premium of IDR 232.06 trillion, a 44% growth year-on-year over 2016. Total assets grew 30% year-on-year to IDR 512.95 trillion. Milliman’s Richard Holloway, Halim Gunawan, and David Kong offer more perspective in the latest Indonesia Life Insurance Newsletter.

Analysis of non-life insurers’ Solvency and Financial Condition Reports: European and Polish non-life insurers (year-end 2016)

Solvency II went live on 1 January 2016 and introduced a number of new disclosure requirements for European insurers. Each insurer is now required to publish annually a Solvency and Financial Condition Report, including some Quantitative Reporting Templates. This European analysis of the non-life market by Milliman’s Marcin Krzykowski and Jarosław Lech covers 140 companies from 11 countries, which together comprise more than €141 billion of gross written premium (GWP) and nearly €224 billion of gross technical provisions, and our Polish analysis is based on 14 solo companies pursuing non-life business in Poland, representing circa 89% of the GWP of the Polish non-life market in 2016.

Analysis of life insurers’ Solvency and Financial Condition Reports: European and Polish life insurers (year-end 2016)

Solvency II came into effect on 1 January 2016 and introduced a number of disclosure requirements for European insurers. Under the new requirements, the majority of European insurers were required to publish detailed Solvency and Financial Condition Reports for the first time in May 2017. This analysis of the European life insurance market by Milliman’s Marcin Krzykowski and Jarosław Lech covers 200 companies from 13 countries, representing approximately €475 billion in gross written premium and approximately €4,700 billion of gross technical provisions.

Social media influencers bear reputational risk that insurance may cover

Influencer marketing is a lucrative business. Top social media influencers can earn upwards of $25,000 per post in partnership with a brand or company. Still, social media influencers must think about reputational risks that can have a measurable effect on their revenue.

In this article, Milliman’s Madeline Johnson discusses why individuals who rely on their name for income may need some type of reputation risk or business interruption insurance. She also explains the factors insurance companies should consider if they design an individual reputation risk insurance product.

Here is an excerpt from the article:

Starting with the premise that our “good name” translates to our own individual “brand,” protecting one’s individual reputation correlates to protecting one’s personal brand – and the corresponding income stream and overall marketability contained therein. Just as Bruce Springsteen insured his voice or Heidi Klum her legs, for many professionals and celebrities their income is often dependent on the individual reputation they have created. As social media usage increases, the potential for a negatively received public comment does too. A negatively received post has potential implications not only for the social media star but also potentially for the partner company or brand. These companies hire influencers and pay them to endorse their products or services on various social media venues. Reputation risk insurance could provide a financial safety net by providing coverage if a significant negative media event occurred that quantifiably affected an influencer’s future revenue stream….

… In exploring a structure for a reputation risk insurance product for individuals, an insurance company would need to consider the ramifications of insuring an influencer’s potentially poor choice in posting. In most insurance policies, the insurer is offering protection from an outside risk exposure, not an intentional communication on social media. From an insurer’s perspective, issues to consider include defining the specific social media coverage event excluding instances where protocols were not used and, most importantly, the ability to quantify the premium and loss coverage accurately. The insurer would need a methodology to estimate the predicted occurrence of the negative social media event to determine the risk of loss to the insurer. We would expect the actuarial value of the covered losses to be a key component to the policy. Insurance companies would need to structure the policy using a set of assumptions related to how much has been damaged or lost and for how long. Evaluating past social media influencer income streams versus changes after varying posts and videos to form a predictive view may be helpful in understanding risk exposure. A prudent approach to determining insurance terms and pricing is to perform an actuarial study to evaluate the frequency and severity data from similar past events. This can be accomplished by evaluating relationships between social media influencers that have partnerships with certain brands or products, costs of the ultimate drop in followers and sales, and any existing mitigation activities.