Central Bank of Ireland review of Solvency II life insurance pricing and reserving assumptions

In February 2017, the Central Bank of Ireland published letters on its website relating to its review of the consistency of Solvency II life insurance pricing and reserving assumptions. This briefing note by Milliman’s Aisling Barrett and Sinéad Clarke summarises the contents of these letters. The authors also reference the contents of the December 2016 industry letter on the standard formula Solvency Capital Requirement.

Annual QRTs: Getting it right first time, every time

This blog is part of the Pillar 3 Reporting series. For more blogs in this series click here.

Over the next few weeks, companies will be finalising their first sets of annual Quantitative Reporting Templates (QRTs) to be submitted under Solvency II. For companies with a financial year-end of 31 December, the reporting deadline is 20 May 2017.

A key part of preparing the annual (or quarterly) QRTs is ensuring the accuracy of the information provided. In this blog post, we highlight some validation processes available to companies.

In recent speaking engagements and publications, the Central Bank of Ireland (CBI) has underlined the importance of ensuring that the supervisory returns are validated and that there is appropriate governance in place so that the directors, who sign off on the annual QRTs, are satisfied that the returns are accurate and complete. In its recent Insurance Quarterly bulletin, the CBI stated that its ‘experience to date has shown that successfully meeting the dual requirements of “fit for purpose” and “right first time” requires firms to manage much better the governance and operational risks around the reporting process.’

Pressure to put in place a validation and governance process also comes from the board as the annual QRTs must be approved at a board level under the Solvency II text. In addition, in Ireland three named directors are required to submit an accuracy certificate on the annual QRTs. The CBI points out that ‘while those signing off returns may not be the people reviewing them, they should ensure that they have a clear process that they can rely on.’

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Lender credit risk transfer considerations for government-sponsored enterprises

One of the roadblocks for lender credit risk transfer (CRT) has been a lack of knowledge and understanding of the risk/reward profile of a potential lender CRT transaction. This article by Milliman’s Madeline Johnson and Jonathan Glowacki provides an overview of lender CRT and uses public information to demonstrate the expected premium and loss rates for a potential lender CRT transaction.

This article was originally published in the March/April 2017 issue of Secondary Marketing Executive.

Infographic: Insurance for craft brewers

April 7th marked National Beer Day, in honor of President Franklin Roosevelt signing a law on that date in 1933 to once again legalize the brewing and selling of beer. It was one of FDR’s first steps toward ending prohibition.

Today, craft beer is a growing market, with the number of small and independent operating breweries in the U.S. totaling 5,301 – a 16.6% increase over the year before. But as with any small, closely held business, this expanding industry faces some unique liabilities. The infographic below is based on an article by Milliman consultant Michael Henk, which examines some of the liabilities that both craft brewers and insurers should consider in order to minimize the financial impact of the risks they face.

Wedding insurance: An infographic on getting hitched without the hitch

Spring has sprung, which means wedding season is just around the corner. But what if there is trouble in paradise—and someone calls off the wedding? Or weather prevents the parents of the groom from making it to the ceremony? Or the venue closes? Or the photographer gets lost?

The average wedding in the United States costs $35,329 (ranging from $12,769 in Mississippi to $88,176 in Manhattan). Pulling off a typical wedding involves a lot of variables–which all introduce the possibility of financial loss. So if you’re looking for information on wedding insurance – either buying it or offering it – check out our “Wedding Insurance 101” infographic, based on an article by Milliman consultant Elizabeth Bart.

SFCR: Some more reports published

This blog is part of the Pillar 3 Reporting series. For more blogs in this series, click here.

Two new Solvency and Financial Condition Reports (SFCRs) were published in the past week. In both cases, the financial reporting date is 31 December 2016, representing an impressive turnaround time for public disclosure. They are both useful examples of Group SFCRs:

• St. James’s Place Group prepared a single SFCR encompassing the public disclosures for the Group and all of the solo entities within the Group with two life company subsidiaries.
• ASR understood it is a Group SFCR and so each of the solo entities has prepared separate SFCRs. ASR has published the public Quantitative Reporting Templates (QRTs) in a separate document which is available on the same web page as the SFCR report.

Company Link Country Reporting Date
St James’s Place Group Link UK 31/12/2016
ASR Group Link

Link

Netherlands 31/12/2016